Early Modern Post

Early modern archiving – two conferences

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A quick heads up about two conferences on early modern archiving, definitely worthy of a quick post to share links, considering the content of my last piece.

CFP: ‘Early Modernists and the Archives, 1400-1800’, 10 June 2014, The National Archives, Kew

http://emarchivesconference2014.wordpress.com/

From their website:

‘This conference will bring postgraduate students and academic historians together with staff from the National Archives in order to showcase research with archival sources, facilitate open discussions on the use of archives, and create networks between postgraduate students and archival staff. Subject areas covered by the conference will include (but are not limited to):

  • Economic history (including the Exchequer, account books, building records, etc.)
  • Military history
  • Religious history
  • History of literature and drama.
  • Gender and family history (through diaries, household account books and family papers)
  • History of the monarchy
  • Imperial history (including exploration and colonial history)
  • Studies of particular individuals and families (through family papers)
  • Legal history (including crime, punishment and legal disputes in early modern society)
  • European Renaissance through art and architecture
  • Methodological approaches/problems to archival investigation’

‘Tranforming Information: Record Keeping in the Early Modern World’, Wednesday, 9 April 2014 to Thursday, 10 April 2014, British Academy, London

http://www.crassh.cam.ac.uk/events/2483/

From their website:

‘Scholars of the early modern world rarely pause to consider how and why the archives upon which they rely came into being, despite the fact that these processes have fundamentally shaped both our knowledge of the past and the technical and specialist skills we must acquire in order to recover and interpret it. This interdisciplinary conference will bring together historians, literary scholars and archivists to explore the phenomenon of record-keeping between the fifteenth and eighteenth centuries and to assess the impulses underpinning it against the backdrop of wider technological, intellectual, political, religious and economic developments. It endeavours to focus fresh attention on the assumptions and constraints behind the creation, control, preservation and use of records in an era of significant change.’

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